Guides and musings about writing

  • Hypothesis?
  • Explains why the topic is important
  • Studies are listed in alphabetical order.
    • Gives the reader an idea of what the paper will cover.
  • Focuses only on reviewing literature that supports the hypothesis. (Also, if it disagrees with it?)
    • If there are papers that agree and disagree with a hypothesis, we need to read and understand both sides. We can provide evidence to support our statements/conclusions and mention disagreements in the literature. Hiding is not scientific research!
  • Descriptions of the prior studies should always be in the past tense because the study has already occurred.
  • Notice that little detail is given about how the study was conducted. Instead, the description focuses on the rationale behind the study. (Recognise the theory behind what I am writing)
  • Notice that the author focuses on the main findings related to the earlier hypothesis.
  • Author points out relevant methodological issues that may have affected the findings.
    • Decided methodology needs to stay as that, on topic. It needs to be sequential.
  • Find connections between papers and describe them appropriately.
  • Discuss findings and how they relate to the hypothesis.
  • Point out limitations that affect the study's validity. Do not go out of the way to explain why it will not work unless it is relevant.
  • Do findings contradict hypotheses?
  • Conclusion sums up the main findings of the literature review and gives suggestions as to what future research should focus on.